Are Black Women Scaring Off Their Men?


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levarg

The Elite BRAVE
Dr. Sweet NUPE said:
L, I've dated a chick who was unemployeed so it really don't matter...all I wanna know is...if she's working and if/will she will begin working.


So you wouldn't look down on a woman that work at Wendy?s ok I agree with that. I wouldn't do that either, however there are some that would not even give a person the time of day simply because some of us "Black Folk" may have our so called "status". Meaning we earned that degree and elevated but tossed our respect for our own Men and Women out the window because we have been earned the graces and benefits of white America and now we may think that we are too good for the next brotha or sista that is still on the come up or working in a place that we refuse to occupy. Which result in a woman saying I don't want him because he didn't go to school and he is a garbage man, or I don't want her because she is not on my level and she wont kiss my azz because I have earned so much more than her so she should be grateful that I got her out of he hood. Some of us just get Arrogant and wonder why we are single and lonely.
 

northern tiger

Active Member
southsuburbs said:
Now I can get with that and I agree it is rude to ask a persons profession.


Well there are some very rude azz black women out there. Interviewing yo azz in your first conversation. Where you work, where you live, how many kids you got, do you wanna get married, do you go to church, are you gay... :smh:
 

Ntelekt

Mr. Telephone Man (1975)
southsuburbs said:
oh lawd, what'd I "say" that was wrong now!?!?
:shh:

Naw, I'm just saying! :D

If you shoot somebody down because they inquire as to what you do...they'd probably be leary to ask you anything else, which would DEFINITELY bring a swift end to a conversation. :lol:

As stated before, I person interested in what you do is simply a way to get to know someone.
Knowing what the person does for a living does not necessarily mean that someone is trying to dig into how much that person is bringing home.
 

southsuburbs

What I Live By...
northern tiger said:
Well there are some very rude azz black women out there. Interviewing yo azz in your first conversation. Where you work, where you live, how many kids you got, do you waana get married, do you go to church, are you gay... :smh:


That's them broads from the WEST SIDE looking for a baby daddy!!
Dont' trip!!!
:sperm:
:D
 

Ntelekt

Mr. Telephone Man (1975)
levarg said:
So you wouldn't look down on a woman that work at Wendy?s ok I agree with that. I wouldn't do that either, however there are some that would not even give a person the time of day simply because some of us "Black Folk" may have our so called "status". Meaning we earned that degree and elevated but tossed our respect for our own Men and Women out the window because we have been earned the graces and benefits of white America and now we may think that we are too good for the next brotha or sista that is still on the come up or working in a place that we refuse to occupy. Which result in a woman saying I don't want him because he didn't go to school and he is a garbage man, or I don't want her because she is not on my level and she wont kiss my azz because I have earned so much more than her so she should be grateful that I got her out of he hood. Some of us just get Arrogant and wonder why we are single and lonely.


Interesting....:)


:idea:

In your opinion, when can personal preferences be applied to the equation of Choice? :swink:
 

northern tiger

Active Member
southsuburbs said:
Why?
What initially attracted you to that person? Could you tell from looking at someone from "across the room" when she "caught your eye" if she works in the front office of Wal-Mart or if she is a cashiere at Wal-Mart?
If she is a just a cashiere and not a VP will that have some bearing on whether you want to see this person again.
I would think that as long as she is able to take care of herself and her responsibility then that is all that should matter to you.
It's rude to ask another person what they do b/c it's none of your business. The money he/she receives from what they do is not going to you any time soon so you dont' need to know.


I hate to say it but I agree. There's a difference between getting to know someone as a person and calculating potential income.
 

northern tiger

Active Member
southsuburbs said:
That's them broads from the WEST SIDE looking for a baby daddy!!
Dont' trip!!!
:sperm:
:D


Typical marginal azz logic from a southsuburbanite who puts cheese on an Italian Beef.:vomit:

For the record, that's those wanna be bourgie broads from the southside who be asking those questions. And by the way, it's bunch of women on the southside looking for baby daddy's as well!!!!!!!!!
 

CEE DOG

Well-Known Member
Warndalyn said:
I always thought, one of the first questions people ask, on dates, is "what do you do?" Isn't that pretty common? I never thought it was rude...I feel it's a legitimate question, when you're trying to get to know someone better.
I agree.
 

MsJag4Jag

Moderator
:sick:

<font color=blue size=4>Question for THE BLACK MEN:

What does it do for a man, a BLACK MAN, if I say I NEED YOU?

Why is a black woman who is accomplished demeaning YOU if she states something she's done and give me a scenario other than conversations like THESE where a woman is always talking about herself? How did a man marry a woman, whom he did not know talked so much about herself and her accomplishments?

Thanks for serious replies only!

BTW: Derrick, I agree with what you said but have questions regarding it. </font>:tup:
 

MsJag4Jag

Moderator
Anthony W.: What is she supposed to NEED you for? What is wrong with her simply WANTING and DESIRING you there? Please explain the difference to me. I want a serious reply please. Thanks.
 

JSU'99

Allergic to stupidity
da_caramel_diva said:
Are Black Women Scaring Off Their Men?
(A Fighting Spirit Is Important, But Not At Home)

The Washington Post By: Joy Jones

Have you met this woman? She has a good job, works hard, and earns a good salary. She went to college, she got her master's degree; she is intelligent. She is personable, articulate, well read, interested in everybody and everything. Yet, she's single. Or maybe you know this one. Active in the church. Faithful, committed, sings in the choir, se! rves on the usher board, and attends every committee meeting. Loves the Lord and knows the Word. You'd think that with her command of the Scriptures and the respect of her church members, she'd have a marriage as solid as a rock. But again, no husband.

Or perhaps you recognize the community activist. She's a black lady, or, as she prefers, an African American woman, on the move. She sports A short natural; sometimes cornrow braids, or even dreadlocks. She's an organizer, a motivator, a dynamo. Her work for her people speaks for itself--organizing women for a self-help, raising funds for A community cause, educating others around a new issue in South Africa. Black ! folks look up to her, and white folks know she's a force to be reckoned with. Yet once again, the men leave her alone. What do these women have in common? They have so much; what is it they lack? Why is it they may be able to hook a man but can't hold him? The women puzzle over this quandary themselves. They gather at professional clubs, at sorority meetings or over coffee at the office and wonder what's wrong with black men? They hold special prayer vigils and fast and pray and beg Jesus to send the men back to church. They find the brothers attending political! strategizing sessions or participating in protests but when it comes time to go home, the brothers go home to someone else.

I know these women because I am all of these wom! en. And after asking over and over again "What's wrong with these men?", it finally dawned on me to ask the question, "What's wrong with us women?" What I have found, and what many of these women have yet to discover, is that the skills that make one successful in the church, community or workplace are not the skills that make one successful in a relationship.

Linear thinking, self-reliance, structured goals and direct action assist one in getting assignments done, in organizing church or club activities or in positioning oneself for a raise, but relationship-building requires different skills. It requires making decisions that not only gratify you, but satisfy others. It means doing things that will keep the peace rather than achieve the ! goal, and sometimes it means creating the peace in the first place. Maintaining a harmonious relationship will not always allow you to take the straight line between two points. You may have to stoop to conquer or yield to win.

In too many cases, when dealing with men, you will have to sacrifice being right in order to enjoy being loved. Being acknowledged as the head of the household is an especially important thing for many black men, since their manhood is so often actively challenged everywhere else. Many modern women are so independent, so self-sufficient, so committed to the cause, to the church, to career or their narrow concepts that their entire personalities project an "I don't need a man" message. So they end u! p without one. An interested man may be attracted but he soon discovers that this sister makes very little space for him in her life. Going to graduate school is a good goal and an option that previous generations of blacks have not had. But sometimes the achieving woman will place her boyfriend so low on her list of priorities that his interest wanes. Between work, school and homework, she's seldom "there" for him, for the preliminaries that might develop a c! ommitment to a woman. She's too busy to prepare him a home-cooked meal or to be a listening ear for his concerns because she is so occupied with her own.

Soon he uses her only for uncommitted sex since to him she appears unavailable for anything else. Blind to the part she's playing in ! the problem, she ends up thinking, "Men only want one thing." And she decides she's better off with the degree than the friendship. When she's 45, she may wish she'd set different priorities while she was younger. It's not just the busy career girl who can't see the forest for the trees.

A couple I know were having marital troubles. During one argument, the husband confronted the wife and asked what she thought they should do about the marriage, what direction they should take. She reached for her Bible and turned to Ephesians. "I know what Paul says and I know what Jesus says about marriage," he told her, "What do you say about our marriage?" Dumbfounded, she could not say anything. Like so many of us, she could recite the Scriptures ! but could not apply them to everyday living. Before the year was out, the husband had filed for divorce. Women who focus on civil rights or community activism have vigorous, fighting spirits and are prepared to do whatever, whenever, to benefit black people. That's good. That's necessary. But it needs to be kept in perspective. It's too easy to save the world and lose your man.

A fighting spirit is important on the battlefield, but a gentler spirit is wanted on the home front. Too many women are winning the battle and losing the home. Sometimes in our determined efforts to be strong believers and hard workers, we contemporary women downplay, denigrate or simply forget our more traditional feminine attributes. Men value wo! men best for the ways we are different from them, not the ways we are the same. Men appreciate us for our grace and beauty. Men enjoy our softness and see it as a way to be in touch with their tender side, a side they dare not show to other men. A hard-working woman is good to have on your committee. But when a man goes home, he'd prefer a loving partner to a hard worker.

It's not an easy transition for the modern black woman to make. It sounds submissive, reactionary, outmoded, and oppressive. We have fought so hard for so many things, and rightfully so. We have known so many men who were shaky, jive and untrustworthy. Yet we must admit that we are shaky, jive and willful in our own ways. Not having a husband allows us to do whatever we wa! nt, when and how we want to do it. Having one means we have to share the power and certain points will have to be surrendered. We are terrified of marriage and commitment, yet dread the prospect of being single and alone.

Throwing ourselves into work seems to fill the void without posing a threat. But like any other drug, the escape eventually becomes the cage. To make the break, we need to do less and "be" more. I am learning to "be still and know," to be trusting. I am learning to stop competing with black men and to collaborate with them, to temper my assertive and aggressive energy with softness and serenity. I'm not preaching a philosophy of "women be seen and not heard." But I have come to realize that I, and many of my ! smart and independent sisters are out of touch with our feminine center and Therefore out of touch with our men. About a year ago, I was at an oldies-but-goodies club.

As a Washingtonian, I love to do the bop and to hand dance styles that were popular when I was a teen. In those dances, the man has his set of steps and the woman has hers, but the couple is still two partners and must move together. On this evening, I was sitting out a record when a thought came to me. If a man were to say, "I'm going to be in charge and you're going to follow. I want you to adjust your ways to fit in with mine" I'd dismiss him as a Neanderthal. With my hand on my hip, I'd tell him that I have just as much sense as he does and that he can't tell me ! what to do. Yet, on the dance floor, I love following a man's lead. I don't feel inferior because my part is different from his, and I don't feel I have to prove that I'm just as able to lead as he is. I simply allow him to take my hand, and I go with the flow.

I am still single. I am over 30 and scared. I am still a member of my church, have no plans to quit my good government job and will continue to do what I can for my people. I think that I have a healthy relationship with a good man. But today, I know that I have to bring some of that spirit of the dance into my relationship. Dancing solo, I've mastered that. Now I'm learning how to accept his lead, and to go with the flow.



I am not mad at Joy!!!!
 

HBCUs

Deep in Tha Heart of...
I'm not trying to start a fight, but it all boils down to attitude and BASIC treatment of people.

Eventually education and portfolio takes a back seat to HOW YOU'RE TREATED. That little "Golden Rule" thing that we learned in grade school/ Bible study applies well into adulthood.


Contrary to popular belief, Black men pay attention to details. We know bitter, arrogant, downright mean, etc. when we see it and we take note of it. Some women are about as nice as rattlesnakes. Nobody wants to deal with that, casually or seriously.

Contrary to popular belief, a few us Black men actually possess degrees and have some concept of formal education. We too like to think that we've earned our status through hard work. We tend to be unimpressed by folks who go out of their way prove things to us.... especially when we haven't asked for any such proof. :retard:


At the end of the day,we all want to deal with someone who's gonna treat us like a desired adult. As long as people neglect to understand that, we'll continue to have these discussion.
 

JSU'99

Allergic to stupidity
J4J said:
:sick:

<font color=blue size=4>Why is a black woman who is accomplished demeaning YOU if she states something she's done and give me a scenario other than conversations like THESE where a woman is always talking about herself? How did a man marry a woman, whom he did not know talked so much about herself and her accomplishments?

Thanks for serious replies only!

BTW: Derrick, I agree with what you said but have questions regarding it. </font>:tup:


j4j, i don't think (from what my brothers and male friends have told me) that they think women are demeaning them when they state what they have accomplished. It is when some of us state I can do this on my own, I don't need a man for **** is what upsets them. And some of us have made this our mantra. that jill scott song says it all really. (thanks caramel!!!) I can change a flat tire, I can take care of myself, but I need you.
 

CEE DOG

Well-Known Member
Question for THE BLACK MEN:

What does it do for a man, a BLACK MAN, if I say I NEED YOU?

Question for THE BLACK MEN:

What does it do for a man, a BLACK MAN, if I say I NEED YOU?

It means you need me as much as I need you. As a man I should be your confidant, your leader in time of a crisis, a friend, a spiritual leader that you can depend on in more than a sexual need. I should be able to arose you by the way I say ?baby I love you?. We should both be able to compliment each other. When you are doing your 9to 5 the professional attitude is a wonderful thing, because when you succeed I succeed. We are as one not two. Leave that work stuff at the door and be my lady. Why should we compete against each other for power? I am sorry a woman has a place in a relationship just as a man if it?s to be successful one and that is not leading her man. If she feels as though she is with a loser then she needs to check herself because it?s not always the other person.

Why is a black woman who is accomplished demeaning YOU if she states something she's done and give me a scenario other than conversations like THESE where a woman is always talking about herself?

It?s wonderful to see a sister get ahead. That means she has goals and we both are on the same page. A woman should not want to be defined by what her career is, Why would she want to be known as Mary the Doctor instead of Mary the love of my life. If she needs to be defined by her title she has self-esteem issues that run deeper than I can help her with. The goal of any successful relationship should be ?One team, One goal?. By that I mean we should be trying to get each other to the next level instead of me getting there and then leaving her in the cold.

How did a man marry a woman, whom he did not know talked so much about herself and her accomplishments?

That?s part of the problem. In most relationships especially if you are just starting after college both parties are just getting in there fields. The problem comes in when one partner starts moving up the career ladder faster then the other one and someone begins to think the dollar defines him or her. Nothing is wrong with her accomplishments, but why must they define our relationship? It didn?t form the start.

Why is a black woman who is accomplished demeaning YOU if she states something she's done and give me a scenario other than conversations like THESE where a woman is always talking about herself?

It?s wonderful to see a sister get ahead. That means she has goals and we both are on the same page. A woman should not want to be defined by what her career is, Why would she want to be known as Mary the Doctor instead of Mary the love of my life. If she needs to be defined by her title she has self-esteem issues that run deeper than I can help her with. The goal of any successful relationship should be ?One team, One goal?. By that I mean we should be trying to get each other to the next level instead of me getting there and then leaving her in the cold.

How did a man marry a woman, whom he did not know talked so much about herself and her accomplishments?

That?s part of the problem. In most relationships especially if you are just starting after college both parties are just getting in there fields. The problem comes in when one partner starts moving up the career ladder faster then the other one and someone begins to think the dollar defines him or her. Nothing is wrong with her accomplishments, but why must they define our relationship? It didn?t form the start.


J4J said:
:sick:

<font color=blue size=4>Question for THE BLACK MEN:

What does it do for a man, a BLACK MAN, if I say I NEED YOU?

Why is a black woman who is accomplished demeaning YOU if she states something she's done and give me a scenario other than conversations like THESE where a woman is always talking about herself? How did a man marry a woman, whom he did not know talked so much about herself and her accomplishments?

Thanks for serious replies only!

BTW: Derrick, I agree with what you said but have questions regarding it. </font>:tup:
 

Ntelekt

Mr. Telephone Man (1975)
J4J said:
Anthony W.: What is she supposed to NEED you for? What is wrong with her simply WANTING and DESIRING you there? Please explain the difference to me. I want a serious reply please. Thanks.


Not sure why you felt the NEED to call me out, but I'll comply! :lol:


It appears (Key word: APPEARS) as if you have a problem with me and my like for Jill Scott's song. :lol:


In a RELATIONSHIP, that "I am independent" mess should go out the window if two people are trying to GROW together (I stated that earlier).

It's cool to be accomplished, degreed, employed, versed, but what good is doing things ALL ON YOUR OWN in a relationship????

If you LOVE someone or if someone LOVES YOU, would it NOT make sense that you NEED that person and vice versa in some capacity???

THAT'S what the song is talking about, THAT'S what *I* focused on in my replies.

Social, political, and educational accomplishments are NOT the things that a successful, nurturing, love-filled RELATIONSHIP are built upon, IMHO.

As I've said many times...the effort used to move up the career ladder is NOT the same methodology that will produce a healthy union between two people.

I give the dancing scenario all the time....no need for me to restate that.

Just so you don't get it twisted, I LOVE to see my Black Sistas doing their thing, and I compliment MANY of them on a regular basis because of it.
The thing is...I SEE these women's accolades and feats and they are NOT verbally thrown in my face every single time I talk to them. ;)

Needless to say, there are many women that are the opposite of what I just described. :smh:


Personally I don't and have never felt a sense of degradation by a Sistah's accomplishments! :look: :shame:

I'm doing the dayum thing in my OWN career, so what do I have to feel bad about?! :lol: :smash:
Because I choose NOT to wear my resume on my sleeve might be a reason why that kind of behavior irks me.

Think about it...
how would it look if I screamed that I was an "INDEPENDENT MAN" every chance I got?! :xeye:

Exactly...:swink:


I HOPE that answered some of your questions, and yes, I STILL do LOVE and APPRECIATE that song by Jill Scott!!! :p

Needing / Wanting / Desiring....I look at those in the same light: the light of a successful RELATIONSHIP!

Hell, I'd NEED her too, but *I* didn't write the song! :lol:

:wavey:

If I STILL make you sick (judging by your smiley usage), oh well...:smug2:
 

da_caramel_diva

New Member
CEE DOG said:
Question for THE BLACK MEN:

What does it do for a man, a BLACK MAN, if I say I NEED YOU?


It means you need me as much as I need you. As a man I should be your confidant, your leader in time of a crisis, a friend, a spiritual leader that you can depend on in more than a sexual need. I should be able to arose you by the way I say ?baby I love you?. We should both be able to compliment each other. When you are doing your 9to 5 the professional attitude is a wonderful thing, because when you succeed I succeed. We are as one not two. Leave that work stuff at the door and be my lady. Why should we compete against each other for power? I am sorry a woman has a place in a relationship just as a man if it?s to be successful one and that is not leading her man. If she feels as though she is with a loser then she needs to check herself because it?s not always the other person.

Why is a black woman who is accomplished demeaning YOU if she states something she's done and give me a scenario other than conversations like THESE where a woman is always talking about herself?

It?s wonderful to see a sister get ahead. That means she has goals and we both are on the same page. A woman should not want to be defined by what her career is, Why would she want to be known as Mary the Doctor instead of Mary the love of my life. If she needs to be defined by her title she has self-esteem issues that run deeper than I can help her with. The goal of any successful relationship should be ?One team, One goal?. By that I mean we should be trying to get each other to the next level instead of me getting there and then leaving her in the cold.

How did a man marry a woman, whom he did not know talked so much about herself and her accomplishments?

That?s part of the problem. In most relationships especially if you are just starting after college both parties are just getting in there fields. The problem comes in when one partner starts moving up the career ladder faster then the other one and someone begins to think the dollar defines him or her. Nothing is wrong with her accomplishments, but why must they define our relationship? It didn?t form the start.


Great response.
 

JSU'99

Allergic to stupidity
CEE DOG said:
Question for THE BLACK MEN:

What does it do for a man, a BLACK MAN, if I say I NEED YOU?

Question for THE BLACK MEN:

What does it do for a man, a BLACK MAN, if I say I NEED YOU?

It means you need me as much as I need you. As a man I should be your confidant, your leader in time of a crisis, a friend, a spiritual leader that you can depend on in more than a sexual need. I should be able to arose you by the way I say ?baby I love you?. We should both be able to compliment each other. When you are doing your 9to 5 the professional attitude is a wonderful thing, because when you succeed I succeed. We are as one not two. Leave that work stuff at the door and be my lady. Why should we compete against each other for power? I am sorry a woman has a place in a relationship just as a man if it?s to be successful one and that is not leading her man. If she feels as though she is with a loser then she needs to check herself because it?s not always the other person.

Why is a black woman who is accomplished demeaning YOU if she states something she's done and give me a scenario other than conversations like THESE where a woman is always talking about herself?

It?s wonderful to see a sister get ahead. That means she has goals and we both are on the same page. A woman should not want to be defined by what her career is, Why would she want to be known as Mary the Doctor instead of Mary the love of my life. If she needs to be defined by her title she has self-esteem issues that run deeper than I can help her with. The goal of any successful relationship should be ?One team, One goal?. By that I mean we should be trying to get each other to the next level instead of me getting there and then leaving her in the cold.

How did a man marry a woman, whom he did not know talked so much about herself and her accomplishments?

That?s part of the problem. In most relationships especially if you are just starting after college both parties are just getting in there fields. The problem comes in when one partner starts moving up the career ladder faster then the other one and someone begins to think the dollar defines him or her. Nothing is wrong with her accomplishments, but why must they define our relationship? It didn?t form the start.

Why is a black woman who is accomplished demeaning YOU if she states something she's done and give me a scenario other than conversations like THESE where a woman is always talking about herself?

It?s wonderful to see a sister get ahead. That means she has goals and we both are on the same page. A woman should not want to be defined by what her career is, Why would she want to be known as Mary the Doctor instead of Mary the love of my life. If she needs to be defined by her title she has self-esteem issues that run deeper than I can help her with. The goal of any successful relationship should be ?One team, One goal?. By that I mean we should be trying to get each other to the next level instead of me getting there and then leaving her in the cold.

How did a man marry a woman, whom he did not know talked so much about herself and her accomplishments?

That?s part of the problem. In most relationships especially if you are just starting after college both parties are just getting in there fields. The problem comes in when one partner starts moving up the career ladder faster then the other one and someone begins to think the dollar defines him or her. Nothing is wrong with her accomplishments, but why must they define our relationship? It didn?t form the start.

you hit the nail on the head!!!
 

HBCUs

Deep in Tha Heart of...
J4J said:
:sick:

<font color=blue size=4>Question for THE BLACK MEN:

What does it do for a man, a BLACK MAN, if I say I NEED YOU?

I think the word "need" may be taken a bit out of context. Personally, it isn't a requirement for someone to "need" me. There's a line between need and needy, and think the two are being confused here.

I think its the arrogant (and negatively overtoned) sentiment expressed by some women that many brothers have a problem with. "I don't need a man to do... (fill in the blank)". "A man cain't do nuthin' for me 'cause... (fill in the blank)". Usually, the educational/financial rundown comes next.

Meanwhile, the brother is sitting there thinking, ":confused: All I wanted was to buy you a drink and chat." :lol:

It's implication of unworthiness that causes the friction. It all goes back to attitiude and the way a person comes across. I think men are GREATLY underestimated for their ability to decipher tone. We're keen enough to recognize a chip on the shoulder.
 

da_caramel_diva

New Member
HBCUs said:
I think the word "need" may be taken a bit out of context. Personally, it isn't a requirement for someone to "need" me. There's a line between need and needy, and think the two are being confused here.

I think its the arrogant (and negatively overtoned) sentiment expressed by some women that many brothers have a problem with. "I don't need a man to do... (fill in the blank)". "A man cain't do nuthin' for me 'cause... (fill in the blank)". Usually, the educational/financial rundown comes next.

Meanwhile, the brother is sitting there thinking, ":confused: All I wanted was to buy you a drink and chat." :lol:

It's implication of unworthiness that causes the friction. It all goes back to attitiude and the way a person comes across. I think men are GREATLY underestimated for their ability to decipher tone. We're keen enough to recognize a chip on the shoulder.


I think that the true essence of being in love and having a successful marraige is that NEED you have for each other. You have to need and want that person in order to have a good relationship be it married or not.
 

MsJag4Jag

Moderator
CEE DOG: THANK YOU FOR YOUR VERY GENUINE RESPONSE. I SEE WHAT YOU'RE SAYING AND I AGREE. I will read it again. I am trying to get this to sink in for me.


Anthony W: Just because you picked out the Jill Scott song, I listen to it all the time and I understand it but there was a part of this entire topic that puzzles me....and since I knew you'd give a well thought out answer, I CHOSE YOU, black man! Is that alright? ;) Now, let me read what you wrote.


JSU or whoever that was up there...I said "demean" because I thought I read that in DNICE's post. If not, charge it to my head and not my heart.
 

Ntelekt

Mr. Telephone Man (1975)
da_caramel_diva said:
I think that the true essence of being in love and having a successful marraige is that NEED you have for each other. You have to need and want that person in order to have a good relationship be it married or not.


I'm glad that I'm not alone in this belief...:):tup:



Preciate that, Warndalyn!!! :wavey:
 

Ntelekt

Mr. Telephone Man (1975)
J4J said:
Anthony W: Just because you picked out the Jill Scott song, I listen to it all the time and I understand it but there was a part of this entire topic that puzzles me....and since I knew you'd give a well thought out answer, I CHOSE YOU, black man! Is that alright? ;) Now, let me read what you wrote.


You ain't even READ it yet?! :xeye: :lmao:

But okay...I hear ya! :D
 
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