The Godfather of Harlem


The Founder

Well-Known Member
When I hear young men saying they are gangsters I automatically equate them to being sell outs, uncle toms, detriments to their communities, fool a$$ niccas, and a host of other terms.

I love the show.....but what I am really waiting on is to see how it handles Dr. King, Malcolm, and the Kennedy's death. All four died before Bumpy. As I was telling a few brothers in the barber shop this is 5 to 6 season show. The further it goes along the further other story lines unfold especially the changes that came with the murders.
 

JROCK

Preeminent
It's been a minute since I've seen that movie. I remember the name Dutch Schultz but I never realized Bumpy had dealings with that Italian Mafia Boss that acted like he was crazy for years.

I also remember, Fishburne played that same character in an 80s movie called, "The Cotton Club."

Dutch was that sick racist character that hated Bumpy with a passion that he ended up killing. If you can recall Clarence Williams III played Dutch's black henchman (can never forget when he rapped up his left overs he was eating off of and told him to bring that home to his family). I don't think they showed the playing crazy Italian (Chin) in Hoodlum but could be wrong....It's been so long ago since I watched it.
 

JROCK

Preeminent
When I hear young men saying they are gangsters I automatically equate them to being sell outs, uncle toms, detriments to their communities, fool a$$ niccas, and a host of other terms.

I love the show.....but what I am really waiting on is to see how it handles Dr. King, Malcolm, and the Kennedy's death. All four died before Bumpy. As I was telling a few brothers in the barber shop this is 5 to 6 season show. The further it goes along the further other story lines unfold especially the changes that came with the murders.

I agree that several seasons can evolve.
 

LAW DAWG

TSU LOVE
Dutch was that sick racist character that hated Bumpy with a passion that he ended up killing. If you can recall Clarence Williams III played Dutch's black henchman (can never forget when he rapped up his left overs he was eating off of and told him to bring that home to his family). I don't think they showed the playing crazy Italian (Chin) in Hoodlum but could be wrong....It's been so long ago since I watched it.

You're not wrong, Forrest Whitaker is playing the role of Bumpy's last five years of life. That's why the first episode starts with his release from Alcatraz in 1963. Hoodlum features the younger Bumpy Johnson that was an enforcer for numbers runner Madame St. Clair. Chin, Vicent Gigante, would have been just a soldier around that time. Years later, around the 70's, he began to play mentally ill. After doing a little reading, I learned one of the other mafia crime bosses said if Chin was really mentally ill, during the time he became a mob boss in 1981, there is no way he and the other crime bosses would have agreed to let him stay in power. Obviously, that makes plenty of sense.
 

LAW DAWG

TSU LOVE
That Esther woman will be the down fall of the Right Reverend......it looks innocuous right now....

I thought her character was one where the writers were using their creative license, but her character was real and as you said she, with the help of the mafioso, caused him some trouble.

Go to the 35:00 minute mark
 

LAW DAWG

TSU LOVE
I really like the way they are integrating actual history into these episodes. The way they brought exposure to the March on Washington and showed footage of A. Philip Randolph and Whitney Young, two brothers all too often left out of black history conversations, was illuminating and thought provoking.

Are any of you aware of Dr. James Smalls? He is a consultant for the show. When I found out he was part of the production I no longer was surprised at the historical relevance of the series.

The HBO series "The Wire" is my all time favorite, but this series "The Godfather of Harlem" is on the way to supplanting it.
 
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The Founder

Well-Known Member
I really like the way they are integrating actual history into these episodes. They way they brought exposure to the March on Washington and showed footage of A. Philip Randolph and Whitney Young, two brothers all too often left out of black history conversations, was illuminating and thought provoking.

Are any of you aware of Dr. James Smalls? He is a consultant for the show. When I found out he was part of the production I no longer was surprised at the historical relevance of the series.

The HBO series "The Wire" is my all time favorite, but this series "The Godfather of Harlem" is on the way to supplanting it.

Bruh.....this show is AWESOME!!!!!

Hell I even like the white gangsters and their historical premise.
 

BulldogM.Ed.23

Bulldog Fan/Supporter
I really like the way they are integrating actual history into these episodes. They way they brought exposure to the March on Washington and showed footage of A. Philip Randolph and Whitney Young, two brothers all too often left out of black history conversations, was illuminating and thought provoking.

Are any of you aware of Dr. James Smalls? He is a consultant for the show. When I found out he was part of the production I no longer was surprised at the historical relevance of the series.

The HBO series "The Wire" is my all time favorite, but this series "The Godfather of Harlem" is on the way to supplanting it.
Yeah, you are a history buff just like myself. So many things have been very well documented within this series alone. Again that is why we can't depend on mainstream media or typical history books to be accurate and tell our stories. Interesting that you mentioned James Smalls. I have been checking out his work/lectures lately thanks to Hidden Colors.

I have more random observations from this series. For one, the mystique of NYC/Harlem. I grew up in one of those households that had Ebony and Jet Magazine. When I reflect on images and influential Blacks that they often highlighted as well as events, it seemed as if they really highlighted, politicians, businessmen, artists, and other people out of NYC as if that was the Black Mecca. Strangely enough, I can think back to the golden age of Hip Hop (late 80s) when most of the rappers highlighted were from parts of NYC, I feel that energy when I watch this series as well. Maybe it's just me (shrugging shoulders).

What's even more intriguing about Adam Clayton Powell is that he was always doing what his white political counterparts were doing. Living his best life. In the end, that would be his downfall just like so many of our own politicians from the 70s, 80s, 90s, 00s. They get in office, assume power but make the mistake of enjoying the liberties of their white counterparts. Unfortunately for them, they get caught slipping and when they do, it's over. They can't get away with it like other's do. Still, I see more and more why Malcolm said in his autobiography we needed more Black Politicians like Powell. At the end of the day, he still had much love for his people....
 

LAW DAWG

TSU LOVE
Now that the season finale is upon us I must say Brother Leon has come a long way, and has done an excellent job playing the role of Malcolm.

 
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BulldogM.Ed.23

Bulldog Fan/Supporter
As much as I loved music, my eyes got big when I saw the Teddy Greene actor meeting Sam Cooke at the Apollo. I had to look him up and see if he was actually a real person which he was not as well as Vin "The Chin" having a daughter that dated a brother. Like many dramatic series, they were trying to add fictional stories to give viewers a feel of the times.

Whoever did the casting really did a good job. There were so many powerful scenes by so many good actors. My man, Giancarlo Esposito and his portrayal of Adam Clayton Powell is my favorite. I have always been very intrigued with Powell and Esposito's portrayal gives me more insight about him. LOL, Powell loved him some JFK apparently...
 

LAW DAWG

TSU LOVE
Took some time to get caught up with Season 2. Seems like there is more fictionalization from the writers. It is still a good watch.

I think they put themselves in a bind and have little choice but to fictionalize more. The time-frame, historically, they put themselves on to start the series has confined them somewhat. Based on the friction between Malcolm and Elijah Muhammad I think the series is in the year 1964. Brother Malcolm was assassinated, sadly, in early 1965.

As you said thought, it is still worth watching.
 

BBALLWILL

Well-Known Member
Thanks for sharing. i have been seeing it on my to view screen but now i will click on it. is it a movie or series for binge watching.
 
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