Jackson State University Sonic Boom of the South (2016-2017)

lilrj1919

1919/1911 Connection
Ouch Frat.
I'm just saying. That's like a black man being said to be privileged to be white. Jackson is not world renowned, believe that crap. Now GSU, FAM, SU, and TNSU are. They are more known across the waters, have done more than 2 major events also. If one thinks just being on Youtube makes them world renowned something is seriously wrong but i digress. Even though GSU is not a solid as the program was under Hutchinson the name is still renowned and it is because of the commercials and traveling overseas multiple times. Not to take away anything form JSU because the band is great but they aren't world famous.
 

JaySBlue

#1SchoolPeriod
I'm just saying. That's like a black man being said to be privileged to be white. Jackson is not world renowned, believe that crap. Now GSU, FAM, SU, and TNSU are. They are more known across the waters, have done more than 2 major events also. If one thinks just being on Youtube makes them world renowned something is seriously wrong but i digress. Even though GSU is not a solid as the program was under Hutchinson the name is still renowned and it is because of the commercials and traveling overseas multiple times. Not to take away anything form JSU because the band is great but they aren't world famous.

Lol I see what you're getting at but as of late, we are world renowned whether you believe it or not. Idk if you're living under a rock or what but these days you don't have to travel or go anywhere to be recognized because of technology which is the point I was making. Not the fact that we are just on YouTube. Our audience is world wide and not just in the states. People from all over the world watch and appreciate our band. The fact that we don't have to travel and do anything special says a hell of a lot about our band program from the audience we receive praise from and the attention we attract. Thanks for your concern tho lol.
 

Blu Bengal

Active Member
UNLV Football Kicks Off Season With Legendary Marching Band

When UNLV and Jackson State University kick off the football season on September 1, it’s going to be a spectacle—but probably not because of what happens during the game. Jackson State posted a 3-6 record in the Southwestern Athletic Conference last year, and the last time the Tigers played a Division I opponent outside the SWAC they got blown out, 70-14, by Middle Tennessee in their 2015 season opener. So despite UNLV’s meager football reputation, the contest is likely to be a Rebels’ rout.

The real fireworks, however, will detonate during halftime, when the Jackson State marching band turns the Sam Boyd Stadium turf into a stage 100 yards long. Dubbed the “Sonic Boom of the South,” the JSU band is a historic act with roots dating back to the 1940s. Since its inception, the program has been at the forefront of the marching movement at HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities), and to this day the Boom is a huge draw.

The mix of precise musicianship, high-energy performance (including the group’s signature “Tiger Run-Out,” a quick-stepping move that kicks off each set) and expert showmanship sets the Sonic Boom apart from other halftime acts, and fans in attendance would be wise to remain seated when the second quarter ends. The show is that good.

UNLV Football Kicks Off Season With Legendary Marching Band - Vegas Seven






 
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Blu Bengal

Active Member
Sonic Boom of the South felt at halftime of UNLV opener

By RON KANTOWSKI
LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL

At halftime of Thursday’s UNLV college football season opener, four limber young men sporting the Jackson State colors strutted onto the field around the 50-yard line at Sam Boyd Stadium.

Their names are Tyler “Mr. Blue Phi” Battle, Joe “Rogue Dynasty” Williams, Abraham “The Prototype” Duffy and Giann “Mr. 704” Soto. Collectively, they are known as the Fab Four — the drum majors for the Sonic Boom of the South, the mighty Jackson State University marching band.

The consensus among press box pundits was that had the Tigers put their drum majors at running back and wide receiver, the game might have been much closer.

When I said the drum majors strutted onto the field, I don’t mean in the way that John Travolta strutted through Brooklyn streets in the closing scene of “Saturday Night Fever.” This was more like the way Earth, Wind & Fire strutted through the chorus of “Boogie Wonderland,” albeit with fewer sequins.

The Prancing J-Settes, which is what Jackson State calls its pom-pom girls, were doing some mighty fine strutting, too.

The reputation of the Jackson State band is so well-known — it has appeared in college football video games and has been enshrined in the NCAA Hall of Champions — that Tony Sanchez said he was considering skipping the halftime pep talk.

“I might sneak out at halftime to watch,” the UNLV coach said.

Boom shaka-laka-laka.

The Sonic Boom resonates. You can even purchase Sonic Boom of the South merchandise through an official online store.

At halftime, the mighty sound produced by the Jackson State marching band reverberated off the Findlay Toyota Tower and the nearby mountaintops and the Plexiglas of the press box. You wanted it to be like “American Pie.” When the players tried to take the field, you hoped the marching band would refuse to yield.

But the Sonic Boom of the South high-stepped it off the ersatz playing surface as only it and some of the other HBCU marching bands can.

The Fab Four strutted.

The Prancing J-Settes shimmied.

The drumline went Boom shaka-laka-laka, Boom shaka-laka-laka.

Sonic Boom of the South felt at halftime of UNLV opener
 
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bernard

^Your Brain On Drugs!
This One's For Me And You, So baby put that glass down and turn the music up!



 
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