Why You Should Start Screening For Hidden Spy Cameras When You Travel


Olde Hornet

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Why You Should Start Screening For Hidden Spy Cameras When You Travel
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https://www.forbes.com/sites/suzann...travel/?utm_source=pocket-newtab#207978c25afd

Innovation and accessibility are driving the explosion of spycams, says Randy Andrews, a video security camera expert and the founder of Logan Security Consulting, which makes the popular Hidden Camera Detector app for the iPhone. “The technology has gotten much, much smaller,” says Andrews. “We’re talking about a micro camera lens the size of a pinhead.”

The smallest hidden camera Andrews has ever seen was embedded inside the cross of a Phillips-screw head. “To the naked eye, it just blends in and is not visible at all,” he says.
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For many travelers, the most worrisome trend is the proliferation of hidden cameras in the United States. “In the beginning, these cameras came out of China and we saw them sold on Chinese websites like Alibaba. Now, of course, Amazon and eBay blatantly sell them,” says Andrews.
 

Olde Hornet

Well-Known Member
https://www.forbes.com/sites/suzann...travel/?utm_source=pocket-newtab#207978c25afd

How to Find a Hidden Camera
With the rapid increase in the number of hidden cameras has come a slew of ways to protect your privacy, including a large number of detection apps. Launched several years ago, the Hidden Camera Detector app has received a surge in downloads over the past six months and now boasts over half a million users, according to Andrews. The iPhone app is free to try for three days and then has a $3.99-a-month subscription.

Using the camera and flashlight on your smartphone, Hidden Camera Detector can help detect the pinhole lens of a spycam in a room. It will also scan for suspicious devices on Wi-Fi, local networks and Bluetooth. “Spy cameras act differently on a network than standard security cameras,” explains Andrews. “Our app is able to distinguish a covert camera on the network based on where it’s reaching out to on the cloud.”

“We make it really simple,” says Andrews. “There's a red box, a yellow box, and a green box. Red means that there’s a high probability that this is a spy camera. Yellow identifies non-covert devices that can be accessed from the internet; that might include a Nest camera or a similar standard security camera. And green just tells you what else is connected to your Wi-Fi network.”
 
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