The Novel Coronavirus-19 Thread 4



unknown1

Well-Known Member
Got my vaccination finally. Boy oh boy I can't wait until these 28 days are up. In Georgia, if you're 16 and up you can basically make an appointment if you can find one. They dont ask for nothin but your id and your insurance. Sat there for about 20 minutes and left. Luckily haven't had any side effects.
 

unknown1

Well-Known Member
Also, try Kroger. They were the only place that I had any luck finding anything close. And look in the hood... everybody skeptical of taking it when it comes to black folks so they have a bunch of open appointments. I was still on the fence until one of my partnas got it. And he's not old or out of shape but that virus beating his ass. This is his third week in and out of ICU.. and that's after 2-3 weeks of being sick at home. With my condition i'm not even about to play games.
 

CEE DOG

Well-Known Member
What amazes me is how in Europe these folks don't play about the coronavirus. They wear their mask. In line they stay a distance from you. If you're walking down the street and both of you have no mask on they step off the side walk or try to not walk directly by you. Amerikkkans got issues.
 

JROCK

Preeminent
Glad to say that I received my shot today.....will still be wearing a mask and being careful though for a minute....
 

unknown1

Well-Known Member
What amazes me is how in Europe these folks don't play about the coronavirus. They wear their mask. In line they stay a distance from you. If you're walking down the street and both of you have no mask on they step off the side walk or try to not walk directly by you. Amerikkkans got issues.

We're too priviledged. Someone pointed out to me how we hate waiting and anything other than right now is an inconvenience. For Americans, the mask is an inconvenience. See overseas, they're used to wearing masks when they're sick to keep other people from getting sick. It's customary...and I didn't realize that either until covid came. Asians are especially good about it.
 

unknown1

Well-Known Member
Glad to say that I received my shot today.....will still be wearing a mask and being careful though for a minute....

Which did you get? And probably the same for me. I lucked up and got the Johnson & Johnson so I only had to take one.
 

pvdogteam

Who ya rootin' for? PVU
Also, try Kroger. They were the only place that I had any luck finding anything close. And look in the hood... everybody skeptical of taking it when it comes to black folks so they have a bunch of open appointments. I was still on the fence until one of my partnas got it. And he's not old or out of shape but that virus beating his ass. This is his third week in and out of ICU.. and that's after 2-3 weeks of being sick at home. With my condition i'm not even about to play games.
yep, Covid nothing to mess with, I'm in decent shape and rarely sick but it put me down for real. I got my first shot last week, don't want that again
 

Olde Hornet

Well-Known Member
Planning to take a cruise this year? You may not be allowed on board without a COVID-19 vaccination

https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/ne...rd-without-a-covid-19-vaccination/ar-BB1eURFB

Erika Behlmer-Rothberg, a 30-year-old Ph.D student from Florida, has finally booked a honeymoon with her husband. She chose a European river-cruise vacation for the week of Christmas as a honeymoon getaway with her husband. She’s in favor of cruise lines requiring vaccines.

“We had put a pause on both our wedding and honeymoon planning until my husband and I got our first doses, because we wouldn’t even dream of leaving the house prior to the vaccine, let alone travel,” Behlmer-Rothberg said.

She and her husband have thought their decision through. “River cruises are a fraction of the size of a major ocean liner,” she said, “so that already limits our exposure.”

The pandemic even informed the couple’s choice of cruise vacation: a river cruise through Germany and the Czech Republic.

“These cruises are usually attract a much older crowd, who I imagine were considered priority in their states for vaccinations,” Behlmer-Rothberg said.

She and her husband will be traveling on Viking River Cruises. The company did not respond to a request for comment.

Viking River Cruises has not announced a vaccination requirement for its upcoming sailings, but the company plans to require daily PCR COVID tests — regarded as the gold standard among coronavirus tests — for guests and crew on its ships to prevent outbreaks of the virus.
 

Olde Hornet

Well-Known Member
Why vaccine passports may be inevitable in next phase of COVID-19

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/health...s-may-be-inevitable-in-next-phase-of-covid-19

As countries around the world become more eager to reduce public health risks and jumpstart their own economies, vaccine passports are becoming a focus of discussion, and in some cases a reality. The European Union, China, and Japan are working to launch their own digital programs, while Israel recently unveiled its “Green Passport”. These programs are being used to gradually — and safely — reopen the world by allowing people to dine or exercise indoors or cross borders with neighboring countries while not exposing communities to further coronavirus outbreaks.

On Monday, Andy Slavitt, senior adviser for the White House COVID-19 Task Force, said that the U.S. does not plan to create such a passport. Instead, Slavitt said that states can develop their own and the federal government is helping to develop standards for equity and privacy that these programs need to uphold. New York has begun developing its own digital certification, known as the Excelsior Pass, which could allow residents into public establishments.

Because the virus cratered the travel and hospitality industries, closing borders and requiring stay-at-home orders to prevent the virus from spreading, both sectors have been among the loudest advocates for such a system. They argue the need is becoming more urgent as travel ramps up and passengers are confused and concerned about other people’s vaccine status. Airlines have also said they want their staff to be able to authenticate COVID-19 test results and vaccination status.
 

Rated R Superstar

Well-Known Member
What amazes me is how in Europe these folks don't play about the coronavirus. They wear their mask. In line they stay a distance from you. If you're walking down the street and both of you have no mask on they step off the side walk or try to not walk directly by you. Amerikkkans got issues.
It’s not just Europe. It’s other countries, too. When cases rise, they restrict travel and go into lockdowns, issue stay at home orders and implement curfews.

In America, when cases go up, all our government does is suggest people not travel and wear two masks when in public.
 

Olde Hornet

Well-Known Member
New Zealand and Australia are great examples of how to handle the virus.

I am waiting for New Zealand to let americans in, I am looking forward to that trip.
 

Olde Hornet

Well-Known Member

Covid: Under-30s offered alternative to Oxford-AstraZeneca jab​



Under-30s are to be offered an alternative Covid vaccine to the AstraZeneca jab due to the evidence linking it to rare blood clots.
The recommendation comes after a review by by drugs regulator MHRA found by the end of March 79 people in the UK had suffered rare blood clots after vaccination - 19 of whom had died.
The regulator said this was not proof the jab had caused the clots.
But it said the link was getting firmer.
The review found:
  • The 79 cases and 19 deaths occurred after 20 million doses were administered - giving a risk of about four in one million
  • Nearly two-thirds of the cases of rare clots were seen in women
  • The people who died were aged between 18 and 79, with three of them aged under 30
  • All the recorded cases occurred after the first dose, although the lower number of second doses meant it was not possible to draw any conclusions from this
It comes as the EU's medicines regulator says unusual blood clots should be listed as a very rare side effect of the jab, but that the benefits outweighed the risks. Some European countries have restricted the vaccine's use.
 

Olde Hornet

Well-Known Member
‘Double Mutant' COVID-19 Variant Found in the Bay Area
:popcorn:


https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/e...-19-variant-found-in-the-bay-area/ar-BB1fiuOa
:read:


A new variant of the coronavirus was discovered in the Bay Area and is believed to be the first of its kind in the United States.

The double mutation is believed to be responsible for a recent surge in cases in India.

Stanford Health experts confirmed the new double mutation of the coronavirus in at least one case in Santa Clara County and suspect there are more.

It is still unclear if this new variant is more dangerous, although it is believed to be more easily transmitted than others.

“There is no definite evidence that this double variant is more virulent or causes more severe disease.,” said Dr. Dean Winslow with Stanford University.
 

Olde Hornet

Well-Known Member
UK variant is now the dominant coronavirus strain in the US, says CDC chief
:popcorn:


https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/e...-19-variant-found-in-the-bay-area/ar-BB1fiuOa
:read:


The coronavirus variant first identified in the United Kingdom is now the most common strain of coronavirus in the United States, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said Wednesday.
"Based on our most recent estimates from CDC surveillance, the B.1.1.7 variant is now the most common lineage circulating in the United States," Walensky said at the White House COVID-19 Response Team briefing.

Studies have suggested that the UK variant is more contagious than the original strain, is possibly more dangerous and associated with a higher risk of death.

There are currently 16,275 confirmed cases of the B.1.1.7 variant in the United States, according to the CDC.

The country's daily rate of new cases rose over most of the last four weeks. Part of that is due to the spread of B.1.1.7 and other concerning variants, Walensky said this week.
 
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Rated R Superstar

Well-Known Member
New Zealand and Australia are great examples of how to handle the virus.

I am waiting for New Zealand to let americans in, I am looking forward to that trip.

Biden actually met with the New Zealand Prime Minister after he was elected. And didn't implement a single thing they did to slow transmission.
 

Olde Hornet

Well-Known Member
Biden actually met with the New Zealand Prime Minister after he was elected. And didn't implement a single thing they did to slow transmission.
Its sad, but I don't think Americans would ever do what New Zealand did to control the virus. Americans would complain about rights and more, the process would be politicalized. The politicians have learned that lying to divide works.

 

Olde Hornet

Well-Known Member

Analysis: Covid-19 vaccinations are climbing. But familiar mistakes could lead to more misery​



For more than a year, the US has battled a ruthless enemy: a novel virus that took no mercy on American communities, crippled hospital systems and took the lives of more than half a million people.

But after a long road of despair, there's good reason to be optimistic now: Covid-19 vaccines are being administered across the US at record speed -- nearly five times faster than the global average.

"We are so close -- so very close -- to getting back to the everyday activities we all miss so much," Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said during a recent White House Covid-19 briefing. "But we're not quite there yet."

Tens of millions of Americans are not yet protected from the virus while the B.1.1.7 variant -- now the dominant strain in the US -- is fueling a rise in cases and hospitalizations, predominantly in younger groups, and threatening to create another surge. And while vaccine eligibility is expected to open to all adults in the next 10 days, some may have to wait months more for immunity.
 

Olde Hornet

Well-Known Member

US colleges will require students to be vaccinated, despite state policies​



A growing number of US colleges have said all students must be fully vaccinated before returning to campus, in a move likely to anger some state governors. At least 14 colleges have said vaccination will be required so far, according to a CNN tally, and that number is expected to grow.
In late March Rutgers University became one of the first institutions to declare that having all students vaccinated will allow for an "expedited return to pre-pandemic normal."

Cornell, Brown, Notre Dame, Northeastern, Syracuse, Ithaca and Fort Lewis have made similar announcements, though all will make exceptions for medical or religious reasons. Cornell has also created an online registration tool so students and staff can register their vaccination status.
Two colleges, St. Edward's University in Austin, Texas, and Nova Southeastern University (NSU) in Broward, Florida, have gone a step further, requiring students and all campus employees to be vaccinated.

NSU's policy puts it on a collision course with Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis. After NSU's announcement on April 1 DeSantis signed an executive order stating that vaccines are available but not mandated. Crucially the order prohibits any government entity or business from requiring a vaccine passport. NSU said Thursday that it is reviewing the executive order.
Vaccine passports are a divisive subject and DeSantis has plenty of company in opposing them. Texas Republican Gov. Greg Abbott has signed an executive order forbidding agencies in the state from requiring a vaccine for any service and Idaho Gov. Brad Little signed a similar order on Wednesday. Critics of vaccine passports point to privacy concerns and fears of overreach by authorities. The White House has made clear that it will not create a federal "vaccine passport" or require shots for travelers or businesses.
 

Olde Hornet

Well-Known Member
The vaccine passport debate actually began in 1897 over a plague vaccine
:popcorn:


https://whyy.org/npr_story_post/the...utm_content=Newsblast:+Coronavirus+Pa.+4/9/21

This isn’t the first time the world has been engaged in a conversation about “vaccine passports.” And there even is a version of a passport currently in use – the World Health Organization-approved yellow card, which since 1969 has been a document for travelers to certain countries to show proof of vaccination for yellow fever and other shots. Without which they can’t visit those countries.

But first, let’s flash back to the late 19th century – 1897 to be exact. A scientist from Odessa, Russia, Waldemar Haffkine, developed a vaccine for plague. He was hailed as the “Jewish Jenner” (a shout-out to Edward Jenner, inventor of the smallpox vaccine in 1796).

Once Haffkine’s vaccine was put into use in British India, discussions started about asking for proof of vaccination in certain circumstances, according to Sanjoy Bhattacharya, a professor of history at the University of York in the U.K. and director of the WHO Collaborating Center for Global Heath Histories.

One area of concern: Hindu and Muslim pilgrimage sites, which, due to population density, were considered spaces where outbreaks of plague could get out of control.
 

Olde Hornet

Well-Known Member
Anthony Fauci reveals which activities he will and won't do now that he's vaccinated — and indoor restaurants are still a no

https://www.businessinsider.com/fau...ies-changed-after-covid-19-vaccination-2021-4

Fauci told Insider how his behavior has and has not changed after getting his COVID-19 vaccine.
He hosts gatherings at home but still won't go to crowded indoor places where people are maskless.
Although the CDC now says vaccinated Americans can travel, Fauci is not planning any trips.

"Whenever we would get together, we would do it outside, freezing our butts off, wearing a mask, having a dinner or having a drink outside on my deck," he said.

Then Fauci, who has served as director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases since 1984, got vaccinated. In a much-photographed moment (see above), he got his first Moderna shot on December 22. In the months that followed, others in his age bracket followed suit.

Being fully vaccinated, Fauci said, has changed his behavior — but only slightly.

The biggest shift is that he and his neighbors have finally moved the party indoors: "We feel very comfortable in the house with no masks, and we can have physical contact and things like that," he said.
 
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