JSU football stadium study among state budget items


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TheeVET

Well-Known Member
JSU currently has pressing academic/dormitories needs, a stadium shouldn't receive priority.
I understand but you’ll be surprised at the financial support that will come from a winning football program such as jsu and especially with a new football stadium. Football rises all tieds.
 
I understand but you’ll be surprised at the financial support that will come from a winning football program such as jsu and especially with a new football stadium. Football rises all tieds.
What that logic, with Gorden's and Carson's winning football programs and average home attendance records, which remain unbroken today, JSU should have had a new football stadium decades again.
 

2kool

Well-Known Member
I hate our HBCUs have to deal with dsyfunctional racist Republican state governments. Texas is 65% minority but yet racist white Republicans control pratically all the economic AND political power in the state .... make it make sense. Texas hasn't elected a Democrat to state wide office since the early 1990s and even then she was basically a "Lite-Republican".

We don't vote down ballot or in off-year elections.
 

Blacknbengal

Well-Known Member
Who are these people? Is this Internet Maynor over here causing a ruckus? Anyone vouched for them? Maybe they're one of those lost Injuns looking for attention.
 

JSU Alum

Active Member

An open letter to JSU alumni and supporters​

Jackson Advocate News Service by Jackson Advocate News Service
June 28th, 2021
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
June 15, 2021

Ladies and Gentlemen:

We are taking this opportunity to address you because of the apparent intention of state political and higher education officials to have Jackson State University removed from Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium. They would like to do it in such a way that it will give the appearance that the JSU community is giving its blessing to the effort, that JSU is being done a favor. An understanding of the facts, however, will reveal the hollowness of the scheme as well as their long-term desire for such a removal.

Listed below are the facts. With the facts in hand, talk with President Thomas Hudson, Black political and community leaders, higher education officials, and any others who can affect the desired outcome.

The stadium was built by the county in 1950 and came under state control in 1960. It was expanded in order to accommodate football games between Mississippi State University and the University of Mississippi. There was even legislation on the books that required funds from those universities to retire the bond indebtedness incurred to expand the facility. (Jackson State University, at the time, was playing its football games on its campus in Alumni Field. The first time that JSU was permitted to play in what is now Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium was October 1967 against Grambling State University.)

In 1975, as a part of the Ayers litigation, Black plaintiffs asked that Jackson State University be given control and ownership of the stadium since the stadium was located in Jackson, since JSU by that time had no stadium of its own, and since by then it played more games in the stadium than all of the other state universities combined. The state refused to accede, even though by that time JSU was generating the money necessary to retire the bond which had previously been assigned to Mississippi State and the University of Mississippi.

By 1990, as the Ayers lawyers continued to press for JSU ownership of the stadium, apparently because of pressure from the college board, JSU President James Lyons indicated that JSU’s budget was not sufficient to maintain the stadium grounds and he, therefore, was not requesting the stadium. This was the first opportunity for the state to provide JSU with a stadium following the demolition of Alumni Field. The state, nevertheless, continued to receive virtually all of its stadium revenue from JSU games.

 
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Damn shame! Mississippi has no shame!
The State of Mississippi knows Memorial Stadium sits on prime real estate. There is a reason Homewood Suites Hotel by Hilton built a new hotel; within walking distance to the stadium. The Fondren area is about to blow up with new developments and the state knows this.

Homewood-Suites-by-Hilton.png
The recently opened Homewood Suites Hotel by Hilton in Fondren obvious believes Deion Sanders will be good for business.

 

atl hornet

Well-Known Member
I hate our HBCUs have to deal with dsyfunctional racist Republican state governments. Texas is 65% minority but yet racist white Republicans control pratically all the economic AND political power in the state .... make it make sense. Texas hasn't elected a Democrat to state wide office since the early 1990s and even then she was basically a "Lite-Republican".

Lot of Hispanics in Texas forget where they came from and are republicans to appease massa
 

tsugraytiger

Well-Known Member
Lot of Hispanics in Texas forget where they came from and are republicans to appease massa
There's like ZERO black and hispanic unity in Texas. They mostly stay in themselves and we do the same ... I see more black people with white people than Hispanics too.

Pretty soon Hispanics will be all you see in Houston. They growing so fast!
 

Earle

Well-Known Member
Lot of Hispanics in Texas forget where they came from and are republicans to appease massa
Lot of Hispancs get to America from those dire poverty conditions in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador as well as Mexico and have the audacity to exhibit racist attitudes towards Black Americans. Additionally, they are "wet-backing illegally across the Texas border by the thousands, and headng straight for Houston and other prosperous areas of Texas and urban America. The Feds estimates that approximately 13M are in the U.S. illegally, but I persopnally would put that number at more than 20M. They (the browning of America) are the reason for the Republicans' recent moves moreso than are Black Americans.
 
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PV-PRIDE

Well-Known Member
This article gives you all you need to understand as to why HBCU's in Mississippi are in the situation they are in...


They Wrote Campaign Checks To Tate Reeves. Then He Appointed Them To Powerful Ed Boards.

In July 2020, eight months after Reeves won the election, Rader cut Reeves yet another check for $50,000, handing the governor one of the largest one-time campaign contributions in his political career — and in a non-election year no less.

It wasn’t long before Reeves gave Rader a gift of his own.

Rader was one of the governor’s four appointees to the Institutions of Higher Learning (IHL) board in May. The board, which oversees the state’s eight public universities, is one of the most coveted political appointments in Mississippi.

And Rader is in good company. All but one of Reeves’ four appointees to the IHL board are campaign donors, according to a review of Reeves’ campaign finance disclosure since 2016. Similarly, all three of Reeves’ recent selections for the Mississippi Community College Board are campaign donors.

Reeves is far from the first governor to award appointments to friends, campaign donors and supporters. The practice is common and legal in Mississippi, though not free from criticism. The insider appointments not only raise ethical questions but are indicative of a system of favoritism that excludes the historically Black colleges and universities.

State Rep. Chris Bell, D-Jackson, said the practice of appointing donors or allies is one way the political system ensures power stays in the hands of Mississippi’s predominantly white institutions at the expense of its HBCUs.

“The IHL is almost like a fourth branch of government in our state,” said Denis Wiesenburg, the president-elect of University of Southern Mississippi’s Faculty Senate who attended many IHL meetings when he was provost of academic affairs. “You have the courts, the executive, the Legislature and then you have the IHL — it is a constitutionally established body that technically has the same standing as the other branches of government.”
 

In_The_662

Deeeeep In The Delta.....
This article gives you all you need to understand as to why HBCU's in Mississippi are in the situation they are in...


They Wrote Campaign Checks To Tate Reeves. Then He Appointed Them To Powerful Ed Boards.

In July 2020, eight months after Reeves won the election, Rader cut Reeves yet another check for $50,000, handing the governor one of the largest one-time campaign contributions in his political career — and in a non-election year no less.

It wasn’t long before Reeves gave Rader a gift of his own.

Rader was one of the governor’s four appointees to the Institutions of Higher Learning (IHL) board in May. The board, which oversees the state’s eight public universities, is one of the most coveted political appointments in Mississippi.

And Rader is in good company. All but one of Reeves’ four appointees to the IHL board are campaign donors, according to a review of Reeves’ campaign finance disclosure since 2016. Similarly, all three of Reeves’ recent selections for the Mississippi Community College Board are campaign donors.

Reeves is far from the first governor to award appointments to friends, campaign donors and supporters. The practice is common and legal in Mississippi, though not free from criticism. The insider appointments not only raise ethical questions but are indicative of a system of favoritism that excludes the historically Black colleges and universities.

State Rep. Chris Bell, D-Jackson, said the practice of appointing donors or allies is one way the political system ensures power stays in the hands of Mississippi’s predominantly white institutions at the expense of its HBCUs.

“The IHL is almost like a fourth branch of government in our state,” said Denis Wiesenburg, the president-elect of University of Southern Mississippi’s Faculty Senate who attended many IHL meetings when he was provost of academic affairs. “You have the courts, the executive, the Legislature and then you have the IHL — it is a constitutionally established body that technically has the same standing as the other branches of government.”

There will be another lawsuit against Mississippi for this. It's happening in plain sight and they KNOW there won't be anything done about it by the black politicians in MS as far as forcing their hands. This also shows why "a seat at the table" is worthless if they own the table

And this time around, we don't need a staggered settlement like they did with Ayers and still didn't honor all of the requirements
 

JSU Alum

Active Member
There will be another lawsuit against Mississippi for this. It's happening in plain sight and they KNOW there won't be anything done about it by the black politicians in MS as far as forcing their hands. This also shows why "a seat at the table" is worthless if they own the table

And this time around, we don't need a staggered settlement like they did with Ayers and still didn't honor all of the requirements

During its April meeting, the State Institutions of Higher Learning staff distributed to the board, and subsequently to the public, a budgetary report which showed that the Ayers allocations – $1.45 million each to Alcorn State University (ASU) and Mississippi Valley State University (MVSU) and $3.8 million to Jackson State University (JSU) – end this fiscal year. The Ayers case had originally been filed in January 1975, alleging that the historically Black institutions of higher learning had been and continued to be discriminated against in terms of funding, among other things. Then, for more than 30 years, the case wound its way through the courts before being settled with relatively small monetary allocations being awarded to those universities.

Despite the allocations ending, however, many issues that underlie the case are perpetual.

  1. This Spring the board authorized a study regarding the building of a football stadium for JSU. This is an issue raised by the plaintiffs in the original filing of the case. Their position was that since JSU did not have a stadium of its own and that Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium was located in Jackson, as was JSU, ownership of the stadium should be transferred to JSU. Then, in a somewhat deceptive move, the board, in the settlement agreement, declared that the stadium would be known as the home of the Jackson State University Tigers. To now pressure JSU to move out of the stadium is an apparent reneging on sentiment, if not the substance of the settlement.
  2. Only $1 million of the $35 million private endowment money for the three universities, written into the settlement, was ever raised. Meanwhile, the Black universities are miles behind the big three predominately white universities in endowment money and nothing is ever mentioned in board meetings about the other $34 million in private endowments.
  3. Rather than being granted authority to offer more attractive programs, since the settlement, MVSU, JSU, and ASU have lost programs. One exception has been the fact that Alcorn did grant its first doctoral degree this May. A more typical case is the one wherein Mississippi Valley had to surrender its recorded music program, which was quickly picked-up by Delta State, making the creation of the Grammy Museum in Cleveland more likely to be established.
 

JSU Alum

Active Member

OPINION: To Maintain a Legacy or Start Afresh? Questions Surround Veterans Memorial Stadium’s Fate​

The Veterans Memorial Stadium in Jackson is an outdoor venue originally built in 1950 and later expanded in 1980. Fit for the finest of athletes, the huge facility presently has a seating capacity of 60,492.

The Jackson State University Tigers have owned the stadium since Gov. Haley Barbour signed the bill on July 1, 2011, bequeathing it to the Tigers from the Department of Finance and Business. This is the 10-year anniversary of the flagship university acquiring ownership of the stadium.

The matchup between Mississippi universities that yielded the current record for attendance at the Veterans Memorial Stadium Record was Mississippi Valley State University versus Alcorn State University on Nov. 7, 1984, with 64,308 fans in attendance. At this point in the season, the Mississippi Valley Delta Devils were 7-0 and Alcorn University Braves 6-0.

Veteran San Francisco 49ers wide receiver Jerry Rice boasts a number of game-play records, such as a single game with 294 yards and five touchdown catches against Kentucky, showcasing his talent as a senior. He lost that Sunday to Alcorn with his team, the Devils, scoring 28 to the Braves’ 42. This game has been referred to as one of the most significant ballgames in not only in Southwestern Athletic Conference history but in football history as a whole.

In April 2021 state lawmakers allocated $250,000 for a feasibility study regarding the possibility of the Tigers building their own stadium. The distance between this Historically Black University and the Veterans Memorial Stadium is four miles.

 

In_The_662

Deeeeep In The Delta.....
Some of us can't seem to understand that point!

Especially up the road in Itta Bena.

During its April meeting, the State Institutions of Higher Learning staff distributed to the board, and subsequently to the public, a budgetary report which showed that the Ayers allocations – $1.45 million each to Alcorn State University (ASU) and Mississippi Valley State University (MVSU) and $3.8 million to Jackson State University (JSU) – end this fiscal year. The Ayers case had originally been filed in January 1975, alleging that the historically Black institutions of higher learning had been and continued to be discriminated against in terms of funding, among other things. Then, for more than 30 years, the case wound its way through the courts before being settled with relatively small monetary allocations being awarded to those universities.

Despite the allocations ending, however, many issues that underlie the case are perpetual.

  1. This Spring the board authorized a study regarding the building of a football stadium for JSU. This is an issue raised by the plaintiffs in the original filing of the case. Their position was that since JSU did not have a stadium of its own and that Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium was located in Jackson, as was JSU, ownership of the stadium should be transferred to JSU. Then, in a somewhat deceptive move, the board, in the settlement agreement, declared that the stadium would be known as the home of the Jackson State University Tigers. To now pressure JSU to move out of the stadium is an apparent reneging on sentiment, if not the substance of the settlement.
  2. Only $1 million of the $35 million private endowment money for the three universities, written into the settlement, was ever raised. Meanwhile, the Black universities are miles behind the big three predominately white universities in endowment money and nothing is ever mentioned in board meetings about the other $34 million in private endowments.
  3. Rather than being granted authority to offer more attractive programs, since the settlement, MVSU, JSU, and ASU have lost programs. One exception has been the fact that Alcorn did grant its first doctoral degree this May. A more typical case is the one wherein Mississippi Valley had to surrender its recorded music program, which was quickly picked-up by Delta State, making the creation of the Grammy Museum in Cleveland more likely to be established.

Don't even remind me of the whole music program situation. That's up with the nursing program (before my time) at Valley being dropped (the state knows if Valley gets a nursing program, it will lock up the Delta as far as black nursing students). That's another reason a lawsuit will happen but you gotta get the right people over it this time around.
 

BraveMan97

Well-Known Member
Nba Playoffs Reaction GIF by NBA
 
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