Jordan Peele's ‘Lovecraft Country’ Drama Series


Tiger1

Well-Known Member
‘Get Out’s Jordan Peele Teams With WBTV, HBO & Bad Robot For ‘Lovecraft Country’ Drama Series; Misha Green Writing

EXCLUSIVE: Get Out writer-director Jordan Peele’s Monkeypaw Productions is teaming with J.J. Abrams’ Bad Robot and Warner Bros Television on Lovecraft Country, a one-hour drama that has been given a straight-to-series order by HBO. The pilot will be written by Underground executive producer/writer Misha Green. Peele will be exec producer along with Green, Abrams and Ben Stephenson. Green will also be showrunner.

There is connective tissue to Peele’s breakout genre feature Get Out, which brought a Black Lives Matter theme to the horror genre. Lovecraft Country focuses on 25-year-old Atticus Black. After his father goes missing, Black joins up with his friend Letitia and his Uncle George to embark on a road trip across 1950s Jim Crow America to find him. This begins a struggle to survive and overcome both the racist terrors of white America and the malevolent spirits that could be ripped from a Lovecraft paperback. The goal is an anthological horror series that reclaims genre storytelling from the African-American perspective.

http://deadline.com/2017/05/jordan-peele-lovecraft-country-hbo-series-misha-green-1202095066/
 

LAW DAWG

TSU LOVE
Interesting, mentioning of green books, sun down towns, backdrop mention of Denmark Vesey, a voice over from James Baldwin and imitating of Rosetta Tharpe.

I'm not a big fan of the show yet, but I do like the historical and cultural referencing.
 

buckwheat1911

Well-Known Member
Last nights episode was strange. Why did the dad kill the lady they found in the other episode? The lady found out that being white wasn’t all that.
 

Journalist

Listen up maggots! And that's an order!
Saw it coming. Stopped watching. Wasn't really feeling the show from the start.

As far as the "why" goes, that's a controversial topic for another day. Lots of people will be offended by the truth.
Montrose actively trying to stop his son from finding out the truth is greater than him playing for the other team.

Also, Lou Gossett's character having a gay romance in "Watchmen" didn't do much for the story.
 

BulldogM.Ed.23

Bulldog Fan/Supporter
Wow, because of all that's on my plate these days, I've only caught half of the first episode. I've had every intention of being caught up through binge watching.

Now normally I can't stand to watch shows set from back in the day during segregation and what not. Now I hear you guys mention these other scenes? Don't know if I want to get caught up now. I guess I just like to see us strong, masculine, running things, in charge, and not taking any crap. Lou Gossett in a gay scene though? Not sure if I want to catch the rest of this now.
 

Journalist

Listen up maggots! And that's an order!
Wow, because of all that's on my plate these days, I've only caught half of the first episode. I've had every intention of being caught up through binge watching.

Now normally I can't stand to watch shows set from back in the day during segregation and what not. Now I hear you guys mention these other scenes? Don't know if I want to get caught up now. I guess I just like to see us strong, masculine, running things, in charge, and not taking any crap. Lou Gossett in a gay scene though? Not sure if I want to catch the rest of this now.
In the Watchmen, it wasn't exactly Lou Gossett himself ... but a younger version of his character in flashbacks.

Lou Gossett's character was revealed to be Regina King character's grandfather and the original Hooded Justice. They did flashbacks in one episode on how he became Hooded Justice after fleeing the Tulsa Race Massacre as a child. Another white super rolled up on him and they started working together and they had a fling. That ended with dude wouldn't help HJ take down white supremacists.

In the end, HJ's wife left him and took their son (Regina King's father) with her because he was dangerous to be around. He became somewhat of a recluse during the events of the original Watchmen comic. By the timeline of the TV series, he was Lou Gossett the old man that used equipment the white supremacists had years ago to hypnotize Don Johnson and made him hang himself in a tree.

Oh, and Dr. Manhattan knew who Lou Gossett was the whole time and didn't tell Regina King ...
 

BulldogM.Ed.23

Bulldog Fan/Supporter
@Journalist Okay, so you where making reference to another scene from another series (Watchman) that is reminiscent to a scene in Lovecraft? I gotcha now. I had watched some of Watchman as well and never finished it. I remember that kid escaping Tulsa during the riots. So that was the kid that grew up to be HJ? When I get the time, I might just go ahead and finish watching Watchman as well. Thanks for taking the time and breaking it down for me.

Anyhow, I have to ask the question that @Attack Dog asked. I ask because if our own people don't write our scripts, it's like that hidden agenda keeps happening to try to make us look weak and not masculine. Now if that is the lifestyle one choses, I'm still going to respect you but when writers in Hollywood keep twisting stories about Black strong men and women to make us look weak, that is what I have problems with.
 

SUJagFan

Well-Known Member
@Journalist Okay, so you where making reference to another scene from another series (Watchman) that is reminiscent to a scene in Lovecraft? I gotcha now. I had watched some of Watchman as well and never finished it. I remember that kid escaping Tulsa during the riots. So that was the kid that grew up to be HJ? When I get the time, I might just go ahead and finish watching Watchman as well. Thanks for taking the time and breaking it down for me.

Anyhow, I have to ask the question that @Attack Dog asked. I ask because if our own people don't write our scripts, it's like that hidden agenda keeps happening to try to make us look weak and not masculine. Now if that is the lifestyle one choses, I'm still going to respect you but when writers in Hollywood keep twisting stories about Black strong men and women to make us look weak, that is what I have problems with.
Well, there is a significantly vocal part of the Black community that is very active in perpetuating that narrative.

Not writing our own scripts may be part of the problem, but when some of our own people enthusiastically support the emasculation of Black men we have an intrinsic problem that starts at home.
 

BulldogM.Ed.23

Bulldog Fan/Supporter
Well, there is a significantly vocal part of the Black community that is very active in perpetuating that narrative.

Not writing our own scripts may be part of the problem, but when some of our own people enthusiastically support the emasculation of Black men we have an intrinsic problem that starts at home.
You are right. Can't disagree with you.
 

Journalist

Listen up maggots! And that's an order!
@Journalist Okay, so you where making reference to another scene from another series (Watchman) that is reminiscent to a scene in Lovecraft? I gotcha now. I had watched some of Watchman as well and never finished it. I remember that kid escaping Tulsa during the riots. So that was the kid that grew up to be HJ? When I get the time, I might just go ahead and finish watching Watchman as well. Thanks for taking the time and breaking it down for me.

Anyhow, I have to ask the question that @Attack Dog asked. I ask because if our own people don't write our scripts, it's like that hidden agenda keeps happening to try to make us look weak and not masculine. Now if that is the lifestyle one choses, I'm still going to respect you but when writers in Hollywood keep twisting stories about Black strong men and women to make us look weak, that is what I have problems with.
Remember, the Watchmen series started off with actual depictions of the Tulsa Massacre (with interest in the massacre after that first episode crashing the Tulsa World site, according to Kendrick). HJ was the kid that boy that escaped, and eventually grew old to be Lou Gossett's character. The girl that he escaped with eventually became his wife.

The second part. I think Montrose's sweetness has more to do with his relationship with Atticus — with George actually being Atticus' father — and some of the overall plot than HJ's tryst with the dude in Watchmen. Atticus is the strong black lead, with Montrose being a weasel for more than just concealing his sexuality. In the eyes of masculinity in the time frame of Lovecraft, being closeted was a safety measure way more than it is now. That being said, I think in Montrose's case, it's just another layer of him concealing things from his "son."

BTW: I'm more pissed at his character being in the way of Tic and Leti as it seems he's Montrose is trying to save himself instead of trying to protect his "son" and his girlfriend (Jurnee Smollett gotta get an Emmy nomination for this though).

Now for what @Attack Dog and others are saying. I don't like shoving in (no pun intended) an alternative lifestyle storyline for the sake of having one. I actually think P Valley did a great job with that and wrapping it in a Southern gothic storytelling mode. But, like Arrow making Mr. Terrific gay (when he wasn't in DC comics prior to the show), and other cases supports the theory that there is an agenda.

All I'm saying is ... if you're going to do it, then make that character good (like Lafayette was in True Blood).
 
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