Christian nationalist movement gains hold on the republican party


Olde Hornet

Well-Known Member
“Christian Nationalism” Used to Be Taboo. Now It’s All the Rage.

https://slate.com/news-and-politics...ionalist-identity-marjorie-taylor-greene.html

A year ago, calling someone a Christian nationalist was an insult.

The phrase was in the air after Jan. 6 rioters had come to the Capitol wielding Christian iconography and speaking of their cause as a religious crusade. Crosses and bibles and banners citing scripture were held aloft by a crowd calling to hang Mike Pence and overthrow a democratic election.

In the aftermath, as many horrified Republicans scrambled to condemn the violence, evangelical pastors decried “Christian nationalism” as deeply dangerous—especially in response to experts and reporters who noted that support for Trumpian extremism had become “inextricable from some parts of white evangelical power in America.”

Al Mohler, the president of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, called Christian nationalism “idolatrous” and pushed back on the idea that evangelical Christianity was linked to what had happened at the Capitol.
 

Olde Hornet

Well-Known Member
A Texas activist argued for 30 years against separation of church and state. Now his ideas are in the conservative mainstream.
:o
::)
:o
::)
:o


https://www.texastribune.org/2022/07/29/texas-church-state-separation-opposition/

In October of last year, Josh Mandel, a candidate in Ohio’s Republican primary for the state’s open U.S. Senate seat, insisted during a debate that “there’s no such thing as separation of church and state.” Three months later, Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch made an off-hand reference to the “so-called separation of … church and state” during oral arguments.

In April, Pennsylvania gubernatorial primary candidate Doug Mastriano, now the Republican nominee, dismissed the separation of church and state as a “myth.”

By June, Colorado Rep. Lauren Boebert, speaking at a Colorado church, proclaimed, “I’m tired of the separation of church and state junk that’s not in the Constitution. It was in a stinking letter, and it means nothing like what they say it does.”

The growing popularity of these kinds of declarations is striking given the place the separation of church and state has occupied in American politics going back to the Founding Fathers. Though the phrase “separation of church and state” does not appear in the U.S. Constitution, the notion is deeply rooted in American jurisprudence and popular culture.

More immediately, the rhetoric has alarmed some Americans who associate the constitutional debate over the church-state split with extreme versions of Christian nationalism.

Yet, antipathy toward the separation of church and state among conservatives is not new but, rather, is a decades-old argument popularized primarily by a controversial Texas activist in the early ’90s, when the religious right was ascendant.
 

Olde Hornet

Well-Known Member
Greene Launches Defense of Christian Nationalism-'Nothing to Be Ashamed Of'

https://www.newsweek.com/marjorie-taylor-greene-launches-defense-christian-nationalism-1731500
Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene has said that being a Christian nationalist is "nothing to be ashamed of" and appeared to hit out at critics during remarks at an event in Texas.

Greene, a Republican who represents Georgia's 14th congressional district, defended her previous comments about being a Christian nationalist at a CPAC event in Dallas on Friday.

In July, Greene told a Turning Point USA event that the Republican Party should be Christian nationalists and she defended those remarks in Dallas as she addressed accusations that she had made remarks similar to Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler.
 

bigmanofds

Well-Known Member
This is nothing new. Religious nationalism has been a part of the human experience since the days of sun worshipers. It’s not going away if there are violent superstitious people looking for a cause to rally behind and selfish individuals looking to take advantage.
 

Herbert77060

Texas Southern University
Those people are no more christian than orange man was. The two word phrase christian nationalism is just the latest expression and dog whistle for the maintenance of white supremacy in this racist society,
You are correct and what is needed is for prominent Black pastors across this nation to call out these people. They need to pen an open letter to them and call them out. I will wait for that to happen.
 

Rated R Superstar

Well-Known Member
You are correct and what is needed is for prominent Black pastors across this nation to call out these people. They need to pen an open letter to them and call them out. I will wait for that to happen.
What is "calling them out" really going to do except amplify them even more? These people do not care, have not cared, about being confronted. In fact, most of these religious zealot political grifters are emboldened by criticism because, in some ways, they believe it justifies their movement.
 

Herbert77060

Texas Southern University
What is "calling them out" really going to do except amplify them even more? These people do not care, have not cared, about being confronted. In fact, most of these religious zealot political grifters are emboldened by criticism because, in some ways, they believe it justifies their movement.
Silence is not ALWAYS golden
 
Top